Events

Upcoming Events

  • Sep
    29
    Threat of Dissent: A History of Ideological Exclusion and Deportation in the United States
    Book Talk by Author Dr. Julia Rose Kraut, in Conversation with Professor Jeannette Estruth 
    Time: 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm EDT/GMT-4
    Location: Online Event
    more >

  • Nov
    10
    Archives of the Self: Short Film as Historical Source
    Dr. Swetha Regunathan, New York University Tisch School of the Arts, in Conversation with Professor Jeannette Estruth
    Time: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm EDT/GMT-4
    Location: Online Event
    more >

  • Dec
    03
    Black Lives Matter and the Muslim Ummah: Historical Roots of Contemporary Connections
    A Conversation with Professor Alaina Morgan, University of Southern California, and Professor Jeannette Estruth
    Time: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm EDT/GMT-4
    Location: Online Event
    more >




Past Events

                    

2020

  Thursday, December 3, 2020

Black Lives Matter and the Muslim Ummah: Historical Roots of Contemporary Connections

A Conversation with Professor Alaina Morgan, University of Southern California, and Professor Jeannette Estruth
Online Event  7:30 pm – 8:30 pm EDT/GMT-4
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program
Contact: Jeannette Estruth  jestruth@bard.edu
  Tuesday, November 10, 2020

Archives of the Self: Short Film as Historical Source

Dr. Swetha Regunathan, New York University Tisch School of the Arts, in Conversation with Professor Jeannette Estruth
Online Event  7:30 pm – 8:30 pm EDT/GMT-4
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program
Contact: Jeannette Estruth  jestruth@bard.edu
  Tuesday, September 29, 2020

Threat of Dissent: A History of Ideological Exclusion and Deportation in the United States

Book Talk by Author Dr. Julia Rose Kraut, in Conversation with Professor Jeannette Estruth 
Online Event  7:30 pm – 9:00 pm EDT/GMT-4
Julia Rose Kraut's Threat of Dissent is the first legal, political, and social history of ideological exclusion and deportation in the United States. The New York Times praises the book, describing how "Kraut writes about what she calls 'ideological exclusion' — the effort to block and even deport noncitizens because of their ideas and beliefs.... [From 1798 to the present,] Kraut traces how different ideologies would be considered intolerably dangerous according to the dominant fears of a given era." This interview with the author will be a deep exploration of her motivating questions and historical methods, and promises to shed light on contemporary conversations about immigration and censorship, political activism, state repression, and First Amendment protections. 
 VIA ZOOM
meeting code: 914 7558 2392
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program
Contact: Jeannette Estruth  845-758-7133  jestruth@bard.edu
Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Historical Studies Research Workshop

For rising seniors preparing to do historical research for their Senior Project.
https://bard.zoom.us/j/93119544946?pwd=QkJ2bzFqQjJPUFc0SEFpSXRZVklldz09  5:00 pm – 7:00 pm EDT/GMT-4
These workshops are designed for rising seniors in Historical Studies or area studies programs preparing to start their Senior Project in the fall. In this two-part series, students will learn strategies for finding, accessing, and evaluating primary and secondary sources for history research.

Session 1: Identifying Sources (Wednesday, May 6,  5–7 pm)
This session will focus on identifying types of sources needed for historical research and strategies for finding secondary sources such as reference material, books, and journal articles.

Session 2: Archival Research (Wednesday, May 13,  5–7 pm)
This session will focus on locating and navigating archival collections (digital and physical) to find primary source material.

Join Zoom Meeting Here
Meeting ID: 931 1954 4946
Password: 845552
One tap mobile
+16465588656,,93119544946# US (New York)
+13017158592,,93119544946# US (Germantown)
Sponsored by: Libraries at Bard College
Contact: Alexa Murphy  amurphy@bard.edu
Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Historical Studies Research Workshop

For rising seniors preparing to do historical research for their Senior Project.
https://bard.zoom.us/j/93119544946?pwd=QkJ2bzFqQjJPUFc0SEFpSXRZVklldz09  5:00 pm – 7:00 pm EDT/GMT-4
These workshops are designed for rising seniors in Historical Studies or area studies programs preparing to start their Senior Project in the fall. In this two-part series, students will learn strategies for finding, accessing, and evaluating primary and secondary sources for history research.

Session 1: Identifying Sources (Wednesday, May 6,  5–7 pm)
This session will focus on identifying types of sources needed for historical research and strategies for finding secondary sources such as reference material, books, and journal articles.

Session 2: Archival Research (Wednesday, May 13,  5–7 pm)
This session will focus on locating and navigating archival collections (digital and physical) to find primary source material.

Join Zoom Meeting Here
Meeting ID: 931 1954 4946
Password: 845552
One tap mobile
+16465588656,,93119544946# US (New York)
+13017158592,,93119544946# US (Germantown)
Sponsored by: Libraries at Bard College
Contact: Alexa Murphy  amurphy@bard.edu
  Thursday, April 2, 2020

Eating Histories: Interactive Dinner Workshop

Manor House Dining Room  6:00 pm – 8:00 pm EDT/GMT-4
Please join Experimental Humanities Food Lab and the Human Rights Program for an interactive dinner workshop with Viven Sansour, a Palestinian writer and conservationist dedicated to preserving seed heritage and bringing it to the table in order to “eat our history rather than store it away as a relic of the past.” Sansour uses images, sketches, film, seeds, and soil to tell old stories with a contemporary twist. 

RSVPs required. Free for students; $10 for faculty and staff.
annandaleonline.org/eatinghistoriesdinner
Sponsored by: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard Farm; Bard Office of Sustainability; Center for Civic Engagement; Center for Curatorial Studies; Chartwells Dining Services; Experimental Humanities Program; Human Rights Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Office of Sustainability
Contact: Rebecca Yoshino  ryoshino@bard.edu
Monday, March 9, 2020

Bard Globalization and International Affairs Info Session

Study Away in NYC! Experience International Affairs First-Hand
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  5:00 pm – 6:00 pm EDT/GMT-4
Meet with BGIA Director Elmira Bayrasli and Associate Dean of Civic Engagement and Director of Strategic Partnerships Brian Mateo for an overview about the program based in NYC, including:

- BGIA faculty and course offerings
- Internships and student projects
- Our dorms in NYC
- How to apply to BGIA
- Q&A
Sponsored by: Bard Abroad; Bard Globalization & International Affairs Program; Political Studies Program
Contact: Brian Mateo  bmateo@bard.edu
  Thursday, March 5, 2020

Anna Rosmus: The Nasty Girl, Film Screening and Discussion

Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  6:00 pm – 8:00 pm EDT/GMT-4
Anna Rosmus, an author and researcher whose high school essay exposed the Nazi past of her home town, will speak about her research and experiences, the importance of historical truth, and the challenges of being labeled a traitor, following the showing of The Nasty Girl, a film based on Anna’s life. Cosponsored by Center for Civic Engagement, German Studies, Hannah Arendt Center, Historical Studies, Political Studies.
Sponsored by: Bard Center for the Study of Hate
Contact:
Tuesday, February 18, 2020

2020 Eugene Meyer Lecture in British History & Literature: George Orwell and Homelessness

Nick Crowson; Chair in Contemporary British History at the University of Birmingham
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  4:45 pm – 6:00 pm EDT/GMT-4
Using Orwell's Down and Out to understand and write histories of homelessness then and now 
 What does George Orwell's classic account of homeless living in London during the interwar years offer the historian? Where should we locate this semi-fictionalised account in the tradition of the incognito social investigator? Professor Crowson's lecture will address these questions and ask how Orwell helps us understand the physical manifestations of homelessness in modern Britain. In doing so, he shows how historians can play a crucial role in facilitating better, historically-informed public discourse around homelessness.

Nick Crowson holds the Chair in Contemporary British History at the University of Birmingham. The author and editor of many books, including Facing Fascism: The Conservative Party and the European Dictators 1935–40; Britain and Europe: A Political History since 1918; and A Historical Guide to NGOs in Britain: Charities, Civil Society and the Voluntary Sector since 1945, he is writing a new history of homelessness in modern Britain seeking to integrate the lived experience with the policy responses. His research is widely used by a range of policy and cultural organisations, including Crisis, Shelter, the Museum of Homelessness and the Cardboard Citizens Theatre Company.

This annual lecture forms part of the endowment of the Chair in British History and Literature that was established in 2010 to commemorate Eugene Meyer (1875–1959)—the owner and publisher of the Washington Post, Chairman of the Federal Reserve, and first President of the World Bank. The endowment has given Bard the opportunity to extend its commitment to teaching and research in modern British studies. 
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program; Victorian Studies
Contact: Richard Aldous  845-758-7667  raldous@bard.edu
Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Abolition/Resistance: Works from the Alan Sussman Collection | Exhibition Opening Reception

Charles P. Stevenson Jr. Library  4:00 pm – 5:30 pm EDT/GMT-4
Please join us for the opening reception on Tuesday, February 18, 4:00-5:30pm, Library Lobby. Exhibition on view through March 30.

Abolition/Resistance offers a chance to view rare and extraordinary works on slavery and racial oppression: first editions of the Narratives of Douglass, Ball, and Equiano, Jefferson’s Notes on Virginia, stunning images from William Still’s Underground Rail Road. This exhibit also includes works by women abolitionists, Stowe, Child, and Grimké along with Black Power movement luminaries: Eldridge Cleaver, Amiri Baraka, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Curated by Kristin Waters '73.
Sponsored by: Libraries at Bard College
Contact: Helene Tieger  845-758-7396  tieger@bard.edu
Tuesday, February 18, 2020 – Monday, March 30, 2020

Abolition/Resistance: Works from the Alan Sussman Collection 

Charles P. Stevenson Jr. Library  Abolition/Resistance offers a chance to view rare and extraordinary works on slavery and racial oppression: first editions of the Narratives of Douglass, Ball, and Equiano, Jefferson’s Notes on Virginia, stunning images from William Still’s Underground Rail Road. This exhibit also includes works by women abolitionists, Stowe, Child, and Grimké along with Black Power movement luminaries: Eldridge Cleaver, Amiri Baraka, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Curated by Kristin Waters '73.

Please join us for the opening reception on Tuesday, February 18, 4:00-5:30pm, Library Lobby
Sponsored by: Libraries at Bard College
Contact: Helene Tieger  845-758-7396  tieger@bard.edu
Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Communities of Obligation: The Political Economy of Ottoman and French Occupation in Egypt

Zoe Griffith, Baruch College (CUNY)
Olin, Room 102  5:00 pm – 6:30 pm EDT/GMT-4
The French invasion and occupation of the Ottoman province of Egypt from 1798 to 1801 is an oft-cited (if misplaced) turning point in the history of the modern Middle East. But just over a decade earlier, another, lesser-known military campaign in Egypt made Napoleon’s invasion possible and thinkable. From 1786 to 1787, the Ottoman central government itself launched a campaign of imperial “reconquest” in Egypt, whose military ruling caste had posed serious challenges to Ottoman sovereignty. These two occupations are rarely discussed in tandem, despite important commonalities. Both occupying powers justified their actions in the language of benevolent “regime change” for the proclaimed benefit of peasants, merchants, and religious scholars. Both the Ottomans and the French used these justifications to extort wealth from Egyptian commercial networks in order to finance the country’s “liberation.” Attention to the networks of debt and obligation incurred during both of these campaigns brings otherwise invisible actors and social categories into the grand narratives of Mediterranean geopolitics and Egypt’s “encounter” with European modernity at the end of the 18th century. 
Sponsored by: Economics Program; French Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program
Contact: Omar Cheta  845-758-6265  ocheta@bard.edu