Events

Upcoming Events

  • Oct
    02
    "Genocide Survivors into Religious Minorities: Armenians in the Turkish Republic"
    Lerna Ekmekcioglu
    Associate Professor of History, Massachussets Institute of Technology

    Time: 6:00 pm
    Location: Olin, Room 202
    more >




Past Events

              

2016

  Monday, November 14, 2016

The Rhode Island Revolution:
The Triumph of Roger Williams

Rockwell Stensrud
Olin, Room 202  4:45 pm
In his long life, during one of the most dynamic periods in English history, Roger Williams (1603-1683) altered the values and the direction of the New World, and he did it with flair. After being banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1635 for sedition, Williams founded Providence with the help of Narragansett and Wampanoag Indians. He insisted that Rhode Island break with the past and honor freedom of conscience for all inhabitants, and that church and state remain separate. By the early 1640s, those dangerous tenets had become a legislative possibility; two decades later they were a reality. The nation that emerged a century and a half later as the United States of America was a direct descendant of Roger Williams’s Rhode Island revolution.

Rockwell Stensrud is the author of Newport: A Lively Experiment 1639-1969 and Inventing Rhode Island: Six Lives. He wrote and co-produced the ABC News series The History of the Eighties; James Cagney for A&E “Biography”; and the series American Women of Achievement.
Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Dean of the College; Historical Studies Program
Contact: Cecile Kuznitz  845-758-6822  kuznitz@bard.edu
Thursday, November 10, 2016

The Hermeneutics of "God-Talk":
The Case of Zoroastrianism

Dr. Yuhan Sohrab-Dinshaw Vevaina
Yarshater Assistant Professor of Avestan and Pahlavi at the University of Toronto

Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  6:00 pm
This conversation, moderated by Shai Secunda (Religion), will probe the efforts of Zoroastrian theologians to make sense of their ancient Iranian tradition; the distinction between theology and critical scholarship in the study of Zoroastrianism; and the sociology of knowledge in a field where  Orientalism, minority identity, and related factors collide. 

Participants are strongly encouraged to read Dr. Vevaina's article “Theologies and Hermeneutics,” in The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Zoroastrianism (2015), 211-234, in advance.  

Contact Shai Secunda for a pdf of the article.  
Sponsored by: Asian Studies Program; Classical Studies Program; Medieval Studies Program; Religion Program; Theology Program
Contact: Shai Secunda  845-758-6822  ssecunda@bard.edu
  Friday, November 4, 2016

Black Lives and Policing: The Larger Context of Ghettoization
 

John Logan, Professor of Sociology at Brown University
Olin, Room 102  1:30 pm
Recent highly publicized police violence has been widely described as "misbehavior."  This presentation will argue that issues of policing need to be tackled within a wider context of the spatial containment of disadvantaged and minority communities that reinforces the privilege of others, in other words, ghettoization.  The  issue was identified by the famous National Commission on Civil Disorders in the 1960s: America's division into two societies, separate and unequal.  The responses proposed by that Commission fifty years ago -- community policing, civilian review boards, better training and more sensitivity -- were not implemented then, and they would have little impact now.
 
After the talk and an intermission for refreshments, Professor Logan will offer an introduction to the user-friendly website on which the talk was based and which could also be used for student and faculty research papers and projects
 
Data Resources on Urban Inequality: The American Communities Project

This presentation will introduce a series of data resources that are readily available through Brown University's American Communities Project.  Some of these cover recent decades: measures of neighborhood-level racial/ethnic and income segregation, school segregation and disparities in school quality.  The Longitudinal Tract Database (LTDB) provides census data for 1970-2010 estimated within 2010 tract boundaries, facilitating studies of neighborhood change and neighborhood effects.  Other data sets in the Urban Transition HGIS provide mapped data for the period 1880-1940.  
See https://www.brown.edu/academics/spatial-structures-in-social-sciences/american-communities-project 
 
John Logan is professor of Sociology at Brown University and Director of its Research Initiative on Spatial Structures in the Social Sciences (S4).   He is the author or editor of numerous books and many scores of articles, including recently (co-authored), “Emergent Ghettos: Black Neighborhoods in New York and Chicago, 1880-1940” American Journal of Sociology, 2015.
Sponsored by: Sociology Program
Contact: Joel Perlmann  845-758-6822  perlmann@levy.org
  Thursday, October 27, 2016

Gender and Migration in France
and the United States

Nancy L. Green
 

Reem-Kayden Center Room 102  5:00 pm
 
Over the last four decades, research has moved from the “discovery” of the history of immigration – initially seen largely as a story of male workers – to a “discovery” of female migrants.  Closer attention to the gender composition of migration streams has become an increasingly important aspects of migration studies. Using the United States and France, two major historical sites of labor immigration, as examples, I will show how gender studies bring new questions – and answers – to the understanding of the history of migration.  How have gender regimes in the countries of origin affected emigration and how has immigration affected gender relations?

Nancy Green is professor of history at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris.   She is the author of several books in French and English including Ready-to-Wear and Ready-to-Work: A Century of Industry and Immigrants in Paris and New York and The Other Americans in Paris : Businessmen, Countesses, Wayward Youth1880-1941.    She recently also co-edited (with sociologist Roger Waldinger) the collection of essays, A century of Transnationalism: Immigrants and Their Homeland Connections.
 
Sponsored by: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Sociology Program
Contact: Joel Perlmann  845-758-6822  perlmann@levy.org
Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Big Beards on the Small Screen: Shtisel
(Israeli Television, 2013-2016)

Discussion & Snacks
Olin, Room 102  7:45 pm
Come watch Shtisel, an Israeli television drama series that follows the intersecting story-lines of a large ultra-Orthodox Jewish family living in the present-day Jerusalem, followed by comments from Yuval Elmelech (Sociology), Cecile Kuznitz (History), and Shai Secunda (Religion). Meet other Jewish Studies faculty and students, hear about spring courses, and enjoy a snack.  
Sponsored by: Hebrew; Historical Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Religion Program; Sociology Program
Contact: Shai Secunda  845-758-6822  ssecunda@bard.edu
Monday, October 24, 2016

Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II

A Lecture by Farah Jasmine Griffin
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  4:30 pm
Farah Jasmine Griffin, William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies at Columbia University

"Her body in the air looked like an abstract sculpture," Griffin writes of Pearl Primus's dance in the 1840s.  

"In her book “Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II,[2013]” Farah Jasmine Griffin, a professor at Columbia University, delves into a largely underexplored aspect of Harlem’s rich history: the years just before, during and immediately after World War II, a period of optimism, creativity and turmoil. Moreover, Griffin uses the lives of three female artists — the choreographer and dancer Pearl Primus, the writer Ann Petry and the composer and pianist Mary Lou Williams — as signposts through an era, in a work that paints the “greatest generation” in a much less flattering light than do the usual jingoistic accounts."  ~The New York Times
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Center for Civic Engagement; Dance Program; Difference and Media Project; Historical Studies Program; Literature Program
Contact: Myra Armstead  845-758-6822  armstead@bard.edu
Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Presidential Debate

Broadcast in BOTH Weis Cinema and the Multipurpose Room
 

Weis Cinema and Multipurpose Room, Bertelsmann Campus Center  9:00 pm – 11:55 am
Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement; Election@Bard and the Bard Debate Union
Contact: Jonathan Becker  845-758-7378  jbecker@bard.edu
  Monday, October 17, 2016

The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters: Communication, Translation, and Networks

Muhsin al-Musawi
Professor of Arabic Studies, Columbia University

Olin, Room 102  6:00 pm
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program; Medieval Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Translation Initiative
Contact: Elizabeth Holt  845-758-6822  holt@bard.edu
Sunday, October 9, 2016

Presidential Debate

Broadcast in BOTH Weis Cinema and the Multipurpose Room
 

Weis Cinema and Multipurpose Room, Bertelsmann Campus Center  9:00 pm – 11:55 am
Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement; Election@Bard and the Bard Debate Union
Contact: Jonathan Becker  845-758-7378  jbecker@bard.edu
Monday, September 26, 2016

First Presidential Debate

Broadcast in BOTH Weis Cinema and the Multipurpose Room
 

Weis Cinema and Multipurpose Room, Bertelsmann Campus Center  9:00 pm – 11:55 am
Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement; Election@Bard and the Bard Debate Union
Contact: Jonathan Becker  845-758-7378  jbecker@bard.edu
Thursday, September 22, 2016

The Authorial "I" Is Always
a Fiction ... Except When It Isn't

Paul Strohm, Columbia University and Queen Mary, University of London
Olin, Room 204  5:00 pm
What is to be made of the poet’s and fiction writer’s invented “I” and the potentially bogus details in which it is arrayed?  With respect to matters of biographical truth, the normal and sensible answer is normally: nothing at all.  Yet the pre-modern literary biographer—limited by a paucity of available material—can hardly afford to neglect this tantalizing source of potential life-evidence.  Author of a recent Chaucer biography, Chaucer’s Tale: 1386 and the Road to Canterbury (2014), Paul Strohm will speak about the interpretative temptations posed by the author’s elusive “I.”  He will pursue this question in writings by Chaucer, and, more briefly, in contemporary instances from gangsta rap and the “non-fiction novels” of Karl Ove Knausgaard.
        
Paul Strohm is the author of Social Chaucer (Harvard, 1989,1994); Hochon's Arrow: The Social Imagination of Fourteenth-Century Texts (Princeton, 1992); England's Empty Throne: Usurpation and Textual Legitimation, 1399-1422 (Yale UK, 1998); Theory and the Premodern Text (Minnesota, 2000); Politique: Languages of Statecraft Between Chaucer and Shakespeare (Notre Dame, 2005); and Chaucer’s Tale: 1386 and the Road to Canterbury (Viking, 2014).  He has been J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Oxford and Garbedian Professor of the Humanities at Columbia University.  He is currently Honorary Research Professor at Queen Mary, University of London.
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program; Literature Program; Medieval Studies Program; Written Arts Program
Contact: Marisa Libbon  845-758-7211  mlibbon@bard.edu
  Tuesday, September 20, 2016

BPI Tutor Information Session

Interested in tutoring for the Bard Prison Initiative? Come join us for pizza!
Campus Center, Red Room 202  5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
The Bard Prison Initiative is looking for tutors for the spring semester, particularly students who are majoring in Math, Science, and Computing and Foreign Languages.  Please join us for pizza and refreshments to learn more about the process of becoming a tutor!
Sponsored by: Bard Prison Initiative
Contact: Sarah Weiner  434-566-9158  sw0634@bard.edu
  Monday, September 12, 2016

Israel, Palestine, and Academia

Derek Penslar
Oxford, Harvard, and the University of Toronto

Olin, Room 102  4:45 pm – 6:00 pm
The Israel-Palestine conflict is highly visible and contentious in student politics. Academic teaching and research on Israel/Palestine is less visible but is a vital component of university life. This talk will illuminate the potential of what scholars do in the classroom and library to not merely replicate the Israel-Palestine conflict on campus but rather to build bridges between students with diverse disciplinary and political orientations.
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Rosenberg Foundation
Contact: Cecile Kuznitz  845-758-7453 
  Monday, September 12, 2016

Theodor Herzl, Race, and Empire

Derek Penslar
Oxford, Harvard, and the University of Toronto

Kline, College Room  12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
During this brown bag lunch Prof. Penslar will discuss his current research on journalistic writings by Theodor Herzl that flesh out ideas about colonialism, race, and empire. His work juxtaposes Herzl's diaries, written in private but intended for a public audience, with his journalism, which was produced for the public yet at times expressed deeply private feelings. The textual interplay reveals that Herzl was deeply embedded in fin de siècle racial and colonial discourse, thought of colonized peoples with a complex mixture of sympathy and antipathy, and held starkly divergent views about Africa and the Orient.
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Rosenberg Foundation
Contact: Cecile Kuznitz  845-758-7453 
  Thursday, September 1, 2016

Historical Studies Pizza Reception

Campus Center, Red Room 202  5:00 pm
Come meet old and new faculty, hear about our courses, learn about the Historical Studies program and eat pizza!
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program
Contact: Melissa Germano  845-758-7667  mgermano@bard.edu
Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Designing a Mapping Assignment

Henderson 106  3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Experimental Humanities Workshop Series
On Mapping
Spring 2016
This workshop series will offer participants introductions to a range of tools for mapping projects in the classroom and in research. All workshops will begin at 3:00 pm in Henderson Annex 106. Experimental Humanities Open Labs follow immediately after in this space where you are welcome to stay to continue working on the mapping tutorials.Sign up for one or all of the workshops at http://goo.gl/forms/9BlZfDpyWj


April 5
Designing a Mapping AssignmentThe first workshop will introduce strategies for planning a mapping project in your course. Introduction to a few web-based platforms that are user-friendly, intuitive, and great for short-term assignments. Hands-on training for using StoryMap JS (including using Gigapixel), ThingLink, and Timescape.


April 19
Neatline (Omeka)Introduction to Neatline, a mapping and annotation tool available via the Omeka web publishing platform. Hands-on training for creating a Neatline exhibit including adding records, creating waypoints, incorporating a timeline and working with image layers.


May 3
Historic MappingHands-on training for georeferencing historic maps, using Map Warper, adding historic data, and instruction for different publishing outputs, including CartoDB and DH Press (a WordPress plugin).
Sponsored by: Experimental Humanities Program
Contact: Gretta Tritch Roman  845-758-6822  gtritchr@bard.edu
Saturday, April 30, 2016

Exciting New Funding Opportunity from Experimental Humanities

Learn more at the Unconference
Reem-Kayden Center  12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
The Experimental Humanities Initiative invites faculty from across Bard College to apply for up to $6,000 in funding to start an innovative process-driven humanities laboratory. In this pilot project, we are open to, and encourage, multiple ideas and proposals about what a humanities lab can be.Applicants can propose to run their laboratory for any specified period between two weeks (appropriate for an intensive laboratory over a college break) and twelve months (appropriate for an extended laboratory that runs Summer 2016 to Spring 2017).

For more information come to our info session during the Unconference on Saturday, April 30th from 12:30-1:30. 
Sponsored by: Experimental Humanities Program
Contact: Heidi Knoblauch  845-752-4385  hknoblau@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 26, 2016

In Praise of Forgetting: Historical Memory and its Ironies- A talk with David Rieff

Join us on Tuesday, April 26th in Olin 102 at 7PM for a talk with David Rieff on his new book "In Praise of Forgetting"
Olin, Room 102  7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
David Rieff is the author of many books, including Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West, A Bed for the Night: Humanitarianism in Crisis, and, most recently, The Reproach of Hunger: Food, Justice, and Money in the 21st Century. He lives in New York City.In his Book "In Praise of Forgetting", He poses hard questions about whether remembrance ever truly has, or indeed ever could, “inoculate” the present against repeating the crimes of the past. He argues that rubbing raw historical wounds—whether self-inflicted or imposed by outside forces—neither remedies injustice nor confers reconciliation. If he is right, then historical memory is not a moral imperative but rather a moral option—sometimes called for, sometimes not. Collective remembrance can be toxic. Sometimes, Rieff concludes, it may be more moral to forget.Ranging widely across some of the defining conflicts of modern times—the Irish Troubles and the Easter Uprising of 1916, the white settlement of Australia, the American Civil War, the Balkan wars, the Holocaust, and 9/11—Rieff presents a pellucid examination of the uses and abuses of historical memory. His contentious, brilliant, and elegant essay is an indispensable work of moral philosophy.We Hope to see you there!!
Sponsored by: Human Rights Program; Human Rights Project
Contact: Aasiyah Ali  845-758-7650  aa6282@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Experimental Humanities Mapping Workshop Series #2 Neatline (Omeka)

Henderson 106  3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Introduction to Neatline, a mapping and annotation tool available via the Omeka web publishing platform. Hands-on training for creating a Neatline exhibit including adding waypoints, incorporating a timeline and working with image layers.
 Experimental Humanities Workshop Series
On Mapping
Spring 2016
This workshop series will offer participants introductions to a range of tools for mapping projects in the classroom and in research. All workshops will begin at 3:00 pm in Henderson Annex 106. Experimental Humanities Open Labs follow immediately after in this space where you are welcome to stay to continue working on the mapping tutorials.Sign up for one or all of the workshops at http://goo.gl/forms/9BlZfDpyWj
Upcoming Workshop
May 3
Historic MappingHands-on training for georeferencing historic maps, using Map Warper, adding historic data, and instruction for different publishing outputs, including CartoDB and DH Press (a WordPress plugin).
Sponsored by: Experimental Humanities Program
Contact: Gretta Tritch Roman  845-758-6822  gtritchr@bard.edu
Thursday, April 14, 2016

Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin: The Big Three and World War Two

Eminent Cambridge historian David Reynolds delivers the 2016 Eugene Meyer Annual Lecture.
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  4:45 pm
David Reynolds is Professor of International History at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Christ's College. He is the author of eleven books, including the Wolfson Prize-winning In Command of History: Churchill Writing and Fighting the Second World War. He has written and presented thirteen historical documentaries for BBC TV, ranging across the international history of the 20th century, including a trilogy on Roosevelt, Churchill and Stalin, as well as the award-winning BBC Radio 4 series America, Empire of Liberty.

Eugene Meyer (1875-1959), for whom the annual lecture and the Eugene Meyer Chair are named, was the owner and publisher of the Washington Post, chairman of the Federal Reserve, and first president of the World Bank. Previous Eugene Meyer speakers include Sir David Cannadine, Andrew Roberts, Fintan O'Toole, Mark Lytle and Colm Tóibín. The Eugene Meyer Chair, held by Professor Richard Aldous, was endowed at Bard in 2010.
Sponsored by: 2016 Eugene Meyer Annual Lecture
Contact: Richard Aldous  845-758-7398  raldous@bard.edu
  Thursday, April 14, 2016

The Revolt against the Indies Company: Saint-Domingue, 1722-1724

Malick W. Ghachem
Associate Professor of History, MIT

Reem-Kayden Center Room 102  4:45 pm
Malick W. Ghachem is a historian and lawyer. His primary areas of concentration are slavery and abolition, criminal law, and constitutional history. He is the author of The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution (Cambridge University Press, 2012), a history of the law of slavery in Saint-Domingue (Haiti) between 1685 and 1804. The book received the American Historical Association’s J. Russell Major Prize for the best work in English on French history and was co-winner of the Caribbean Studies Association’s Gordon K. and Sybil Lewis Prize for the best book published in the field of Caribbean studies over the past three years. He teaches courses on the Age of Revolution, Slavery and Abolition, American criminal justice, and other topics.

Professor Ghachem earned his undergraduate and law degrees from Harvard University and his doctorate in history from Stanford. He clerked for the Honorable Rosemary Barkett of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit in Miami, FL in 2004. A member of the Massachusetts bar, Professor Ghachem practiced law in Boston from 2005 to 2010 for two law firms: Zalkind, Rodriguez, Lunt & Duncan LLP and Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP. For part of that period (2006-2007) he served as a lecturer in MIT’s Political Science Department. Between 2010 and 2013, he taught at the University of Maine School of Law in Portland, ME, where he is now a Senior Scholar.
Sponsored by: American Studies Program; French Studies Program; Historical Studies Program
Contact: Tabetha Ewing  845-758-7548  ewing@bard.edu
  Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Budapest’s Galician October: Hungarian Jews and the World War I Jewish Refugee Crisis

Rebekah Klein-Pejšová '94
Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Purdue University

Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  5:00 pm
It is not difficult for us to imagine the sight of Budapest’s railway stations crowded with refugees after the summer of 2015. One hundred and one years earlier, in the early days of the First World War, Budapest’s train stations served as sites from which Galician Jewish refugees were sent to Vienna in transports arranged and financed by the Budapest Jewish Community. This talk probes why the Budapest Jewish community cooperated with the Hungarian wartime administration in clearing Austrian – that is, Galician Jewish – refugees from Hungarian territory, against a backdrop of the wider Hungarian Jewish response to the Jewish refugee crisis in Austria-Hungary. It offers insight into the often hasty and improvisational nature of wartime refugee assistance during the first mass civilian displacement crisis of the twentieth century.

Rebekah Klein-Pejšová, a 1994 graduate of Bard College, is the author of Mapping Jewish Loyalties in Interwar Slovakia (Indiana University Press, 2015).
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Office of Alumni/ae Affairs
Contact: Cecile Kuznitz  845-758-7543  kuznitz@bard.edu
Monday, April 11, 2016

Excellent Daughters: The Secret Lives of Young Women Who Are Transforming the Arab World

Katherine Zoepf
Olin, Room 202  6:30 pm
For more than a decade, Katherine Zoepf has lived in or traveled throughout the Arab world, reporting on the lives of women, whose role in the region has never been more in flux. Only a generation ago, female adolescence as we know it in the West did not exist in the Middle East. There were only children and married women. Today, young Arab women outnumber men in universities, and a few are beginning to face down religious and social tradition in order to live independently, to delay marriage, and to pursue professional goals. Hundreds of thousands of devout girls and women are attending Qur’anic schools—and using the training to argue for greater rights and freedoms from an Islamic perspective. And, in 2011, young women helped to lead antigovernment protests in the Arab Spring.  In Syria, before its civil war, Zoepf documents a complex society in the midst of soul searching about its place in the world and about the role of women. In Lebanon, she documents a country that on the surface is freer than other Arab nations but whose women must balance extreme standards of self-presentation with Islamic codes of virtue. In Abu Dhabi, Zoepf reports on a generation of Arab women who’ve found freedom in work outside the home. In Saudi Arabia she chronicles driving protests and women entering the retail industry for the first time. In the aftermath of Tahrir Square, she examines the crucial role of women in Egypt's popular uprising.  This reading will illuminate some of the voices Zoepf showcases in her book.  Katherine Zoepf lived in Syria and Lebanon from 2004 to 2007 while working as a stringer for The New York Times; she also worked in the Times's Baghdad bureau in 2008. Since 2010, she has been a fellow at New America. Her work has appeared in The New York Observer, The Chronicle of Higher EducationThe New York Times Magazine, and The New Yorker, among other publications. She is a graduate of Princeton University and the London School of Economics. 
Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program
Contact: Christian Crouch  845-758-6874  crouch@bard.edu
Friday, April 8, 2016

Sound in Theory, Sound in Practice

April 7-8, 2016 at Bard College
a two day symposium exploring the place of sound in the arts, sciences, and humanities

Blum  9:00 am
Friday, April 8 @Blum

9am Prelude
Georgian Polyphony Workshop with Carl Linich

10am  Aurality
A panel discussion with Tomie Hahn (RPI), Brian Hochman (Georgetown University), Julianne Swartz (Bard College), & Amanda Weidman (Bryn Mawr College)
Chaired by Alex Benson (Bard College0

11:30am  Interlude
Physics of Sound with Matthew Deady
Soundwalk with Todd Shalom

1:00pm  Transmission
A panal discussion with Masha Godovannaya (Smolny College), Tom Porcello (Vassar College), Drew Thompson (Bard College0, and Olga Touloumi (Bard College0
Chaired by Danielle Riou (Bard College)

2:30pm Interlude
Oral History Workshop with Suzanne Snider
Soundwalk with Todd Shalom

3:30pm  Resonance
A panel discussion with Marie Abe (Boston University), Emilio Distretti (Al-Quds), Erica Robles-Anderson (NYU), Maria Sonevytsky (Bard College), & David Suisman (University of Delaware)
Chaired by Laura Kunreuther

5:00pm  Deep Listening Workshop
with Pauline Oliveros

6:00pm  Closing Remarks
 **This event is free and open to the public. 
Registration is required for all interludes**

 
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Anthropology Program; Art History Program; Center for Civic Engagement; Computer Science Program; Dean of the College; Division of Languages and Literature; Division of Science, Mathematics, and Computing; Division of Social Studies; Division of the Arts; Experimental Humanities Program; Film and Electronic Arts Program; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Project; Office of the President; Physics Program; Studio Arts Program
Contact: Laura Kunreuther  845-758-7215  kunreuth@bard.edu
  Thursday, April 7, 2016

Sound in Theory, Sound in Practice

April 7-8, 2016 at Bard College
a two day symposium exploring the place of sound in the arts, sciences, and humanities

László Z. Bitó '60 Conservatory Building  2:30 pm
Thursday, April 7 @Bito

2:30pm Opening Lecture
Emily Thompson (Princeton University)
Sound Theory as Sound Practice

4pm  Exhinition Opening
Featuring work by Lesley Flanigan, Tristan Perich, Natalia Fedorova, and Bard College faculty and students

5:30pm Keynote Lecture
Jonathan Sterne
Professor and James McGill Chair in
Culture & Technology, McGill University
Audile Scarification:
Notes on the Normalization of Hearing Damage
 **This event is free and open to the public. 
Registration is required for all interludes**

 
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Anthropology Program; Art History Program; Center for Civic Engagement; Computer Science Program; Dean of the College; Division of Languages and Literature; Division of Science, Mathematics, and Computing; Division of Social Studies; Division of the Arts; Experimental Humanities Program; Film and Electronic Arts Program; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Project; Office of the President; Physics Program; Studio Arts Program
Contact: Laura Kunreuther  845-758-7215  kunreuth@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Designing a Mapping Assignment

Henderson 106  3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Experimental Humanities Workshop Series
On Mapping
Spring 2016
This workshop series will offer participants introductions to a range of tools for mapping projects in the classroom and in research. All workshops will begin at 3:00 pm in Henderson Annex 106. Experimental Humanities Open Labs follow immediately after in this space where you are welcome to stay to continue working on the mapping tutorials.Sign up for one or all of the workshops at http://goo.gl/forms/9BlZfDpyWj


April 5
Designing a Mapping AssignmentThe first workshop will introduce strategies for planning a mapping project in your course. Introduction to a few web-based platforms that are user-friendly, intuitive, and great for short-term assignments. Hands-on training for using StoryMap JS (including using Gigapixel), ThingLink, and Timescape.


April 19
Neatline (Omeka)Introduction to Neatline, a mapping and annotation tool available via the Omeka web publishing platform. Hands-on training for creating a Neatline exhibit including adding records, creating waypoints, incorporating a timeline and working with image layers.


May 3
Historic MappingHands-on training for georeferencing historic maps, using Map Warper, adding historic data, and instruction for different publishing outputs, including CartoDB and DH Press (a WordPress plugin).
Sponsored by: Experimental Humanities Program
Contact: Gretta Tritch Roman  845-758-6822  gtritchr@bard.edu
Saturday, April 2, 2016

Celebrating the Saw Kill: 175 Years of Scenic Protection

Montgomery Place, Stevenson Library  10:00 am – 4:00 pm
This day-long event commemorates the1841 scenic preservation agreement between the owners of Montgomery Place and Blithewood, two historic estates now part of the Bard campus. Louise Livingston, the owner of Montgomery Place, and Robert Donaldson, the owner of Blithewood, agreed to purchase industrial mills along the Saw Kill from John Church Cruger and demolish them to preserve the scenic beauty of the Saw Kill. It is perhaps the earliest conservation agreement in the nation

To focus attention on this historic event, there will be an  exhibit, symposium, and walking tours on ecology and archaeology of the Saw Kill, and the landscape and architectural features of Montgomery Place and Blithewood, which are significant for their rare surviving examples of the  work of noted 19th-century Romantic-era landscape designer Andrew Jackson Downing and architect A. J. Davis.

For the event, the historic house will be open for tours on the half hour between 1:00 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Lunch will be available for purchase. Space is limited and must be reserved. Please RSVP: civic@bard.edu

For more information and a complete schedule of events, click here.

This program is sponsored by the Center for Civic Engagement at Bard, Bard Environment and Urban Studies, American Studies, Historical Studies, and Landscape and Arboretum Studies Programs, Historic Red Hook, and Saw Kill Watershed Community.
Contact: Cynthia Koch  845-514-8457  ckoch@bard.edu
Thursday, February 25, 2016

A Reading by Luc Sante

Bard Hall  7:00 pm
Award-winning author Luc Sante, Bard’s visiting professor of writing and photography, reads from his most recent book, The Other Paris.

The Other Paris offers a panoramic view of the shadow city within the great French metropolis, drawing on testimony from a great range of witnesses, from Balzac and Hugo to assorted boulevardiers, rabble-rousers, and tramps. Sante scuttles through the knotted streets of pre-Haussmann Paris, through the improvised accommodations of the original bohemians, through the whorehouses and dance halls and hobo shelters of the old city. A lively survey of labor conditions, prostitution, drinking, crime, and popular entertainment, and of the reporters, réaliste singers, pamphleteers, and poets who chronicled their evolution, The Other Paris is a book meant to upend the story of the French capital, to reclaim the city from the bons vivants and the speculators, and to hold a light to the works and lives of those expunged from its center by the forces of profit.

“This brilliant, beautifully written essay is the finest book I have ever read about Paris. Ever. Thank you, Luc Sante.” —Paul Auster

The Other Paris is a heartbreaking spectacle, immense in intellectual and political scope and emotional reach. Peopled by crooks and movie stars, gamblers and thinkers, the world’s premier city of dreams is rendered, through Luc Sante’s fine hand, historian’s eye, and poet’s heart, into a place we hardly knew-a world of hitherto unknown mysteries and realities. A grand journey in an epic work.” —Hilton Als

The reading takes place on 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 25th, in Bard Hall, and is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Books will be available for sale and signing from Oblong Books & Music.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Tuesday, February 23, 2016

The Ottoman Scramble for Africa

Mostafa Minawi
Assistant Professor of History, Cornell University

Olin, Room 203  6:00 pm
As the inter-imperial competition for territorial expansion in Africa heated up in the last 20 years of the 19th century, Istanbul devised a complex strategy that allowed it to give its imperial counterparts a run for their money. This talk will focus on one aspect of this strategy, which involved building a partnership with the local power brokers in the Eastern Sahara and the Lake Chad Basin.

Mostafa Minawi is Assistant Professor of History and the Director of the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Initiative (OTSI) at Cornell University. He is currently a visiting research fellow at the Remarque Institute, NYU. His book, The Ottoman Scramble for Africa: Empire and Diplomacy in the Sahara and The Hijaz, will be published by Stanford University Press in May 2016.
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program
Contact: Omar Cheta  845-758-6265  ocheta@bard.edu
Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Shepherds Astray in Tragedy and Epic

a lecture by Julia Scarborough
Olin LC 208  4:30 pm
Why do Virgil’s shepherds stop singing and start killing?  In his heroic epic, the Aeneid, we might expect the poet to leave behind the pastoral world of his Eclogues, where peaceful shepherds devote themselves to song.  Instead, at crucial junctures, shepherds enter the action – with catastrophic results, culminating in war between Aeneas’ Trojans and the Italians with whom they are fated to merge in a new Roman nation.  The clash of pastoral and epic has troubled both ancient and modern critics.  Does Virgil simply not know how to start an epic war?  Are the Italian shepherds innocent victims of an imperialist invasion, or are they violent rustics in need of civilizing leadership?  I argue that the key to understanding the role of pastoral in the epic is recognizing a third genre at work: tragedy.  Shepherds in Attic tragedy bring disruption onto the stage; their good intentions combined with inexperience make them dangerous.  This role offers a paradigm for the part played by shepherds in the Aeneid – including the poem’s most important shepherd: Aeneas himself.  Invoking tensions inherent in the figure of the shepherd in tragedy, Virgil transforms the Homeric metaphor of the hero as shepherd of his people to explore the tragic ironies in which Aeneas is implicated as he struggles to fulfill his destiny.
Sponsored by: Classical Studies Program; Dean of the College
Contact: Jamie Romm  romm@bard.edu
  Thursday, February 11, 2016

“But Are They Colored?”: Asian Americans and Segregated Schools in the South

Stephanie Hinnershitz
Assistant Professor of History
Valdosta State University

Reem-Kayden Center Room 102  6:00 pm
During the early-to-mid twentieth century, principals and superintendents of segregated schools in the South faced a perplexing question: Were Asian American children white or colored? The question was important for deciding where the small number of Asian American students should attend school and a firm answer was necessary for upholding racial segregation and maintaining social order. Asian Americans were just as concerned with the question of their racial identity in, as one Chinese American student explained, a “two color” society. While laws pertaining to school segregation for Asian Americans varied throughout the South, battles between school districts and Asian American parents over their right to send their children to white schools resulted in local, state, and federal courts determining the “correct” race of Asian Americans for segregation purposes. Asian Americans did not readily accept the courts’ decisions, however, and actively pursued their rights to send their children to white schools through lawsuits and appeals. The Lum v. Rice Supreme Court decision and the Bond v. Tij Fung Supreme Court of Mississippi case (both from 1927) highlight the fascinating legal strategies that Asian Americans used in fighting school segregation in Mississippi and expose the understudied connections among Asian immigration, citizenship, and Jim Crow prior to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision.
Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Dean of the College; Historical Studies Program
Contact: Christian Crouch  845-758-6874  crouch@bard.edu
Thursday, February 11, 2016

Head-and-Shoulder-Hunting in the Americas:
Walter Freeman and the Visual Culture of Lobotomy

Miriam Posner,
Program Coordinator & Core Faculty,
Center for Digital Humanities, UCLA

RKC 103  5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Between 1936 and 1967, Walter Freeman, a prominent neurologist, lobotomized as many as 3,500 Americans. Freeman was also an obsessive photographer, taking patients’ photographs before their operations and tracking them down years — even decades — later. In this presentation, Miriam Posner details her efforts to understand why Freeman was so devoted to this practice, using computer-assisted image-mining and -analysis techniques to show how these images fit into the larger visual culture of 20th-century psychiatry.
Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; Experimental Humanities Program; Historical Studies Program; Science, Technology, and Society Program
Contact: Heidi Knoblauch  845-752-4385  hknoblau@bard.edu
Thursday, February 11, 2016

The Song of Ismenias and the Tragic Destruction of Thebes

a lecture by Jacqueline Michelle Arthur-Montagne
Olin LC 208  4:30 pm
The destruction of the city of Thebes by Alexander the Great in the Greek Alexander Romance is unlike any other account of the event in ancient histories. In the fictional Romance, Alexander engages in a sophistic debate with the flute-player Ismenias on whether the Thebes of the tragic imagination should be preserved. In this presentation, Jacqueline Arthur-Montagne will investigate how this debate reflects on the value and vitality of Athenian tragedy in Imperial Greece, and why prose fiction becomes the genre in which this tragic legacy is contested.
Sponsored by: Classical Studies Program; Dean of the College
Contact: Jamie Romm  romm@bard.edu
Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Wear a Hat to Keep Your Feet Warm, and Other Lessons from the Science of Dressing for Extreme Weather in World War II

Rachel Gross
Olin, Room 203  5:00 pm
For outdoorspeople and residents of cold climates, layering clothing to avoid overheating might seem like common sense. If it does, that is in part because a group of clothing experts pushed their vision of bodily safety in cold weather over seventy years ago.
 
During World War II, the U.S. Army and expert mountaineers designed and tested new uniforms and equipment for American soldiers. Between 1941 and 1945, the Army organized expeditions to the continent’s tallest mountains, built sealed rooms that simulated arctic winds and jungle heat, and taught hundreds of thousands of soldiers how to wear clothes. The military’s goal was to build a better soldier who would be warm, comfortable, and effective in combat. But the team of military scientists and outdoorspeople serving as consultants clashed over how to determine the right products for American bodies. Would war-tested clothing win out? Or the clothes developed in stateside laboratories?
 
The best way to master the outdoors mattered desperately, for there were millions of soldiers whose lives depended on the Army’s choices about what they should wear. Innovations such as down sleeping bags and nylon tents had consequences far beyond the war itself. The intimate, sweaty details of soldiers’ day-to-day lives and the lessons they learned while in service—lessons like layering clothing or wearing a hat to keep extremities warm—shaped their recreational interests and practices in the postwar period.
 
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Historical Studies Program
Contact: Christian Crouch  845-758-6874  crouch@bard.edu
Monday, February 8, 2016

NOTE: New location  |  The End of Exoticism in Heliodorus’ Aethiopica


a lecture by Robert Cioffi
Olin, Room 205  4:30 pm
NOTE: New location 
Griffins, giraffes, giants, and gymnosophists (naked sages): these are just a few features of the exoticism on display in Heliodorus’ Ethiopian Story (Aethiopica, written 3rd/4th century CE). The latest, longest, and grandest of the Greek novels, the Aethiopica has won many fans, from the renaissance humanist Angelo Poliziano to Racine to Cervantes. Heliodorus’ narrative shows us how the literary horizons of the Roman empire ignited a very particular Greek fictional imaginary about the edges of the earth, and, long before the likes of Said, it leads us to the heart of an exoticizing ethnographic discourse and a discussion of cultural difference. Focusing on the narrative of the tenth and final book of the Aethiopica, I argue that this book represents both the heights of the genre’s exoticism and also, paradoxically, its undoing. The conclusion of the novel, I propose, marks an end in more than one sense, completing a ritual, completing a narrative, and, in a way, completing a genre by transforming its paradigms. As this novel traverses—and writes—the Mediterranean world, I show that it constructs the identity of humans, cultures, and genres, all the while creating social, cultural, and literary networks in the Roman imperial period.
Sponsored by: Classical Studies Program; Dean of the College
Contact: Jamie Romm  romm@bard.edu
  Thursday, February 4, 2016

"Exporting Service: Houston and the Globalization of Oil Expertise"

Betsy Beasley
PhD Candidate, American Studies, Yale University

Reem-Kayden Center Room 102  5:00 pm
How can we explain the fact that Houston-based oilfield services companies, like Halliburton and Schlumberger, operate on every oilfield in every oil-producing country around the world except China—even in countries that are explicitly antagonistic to U.S. capital? This talk argues that answering that question requires not just economic or geopolitical analysis but the methodological tools of transnational cultural history. After World War II, Houston-based oilfield services companies established themselves culturally, politically, and economically as the providers of logistical, engineering, and technical support to oilfields worldwide. This business strategy helped to transform Houston, both materially and culturally, from a blue-collar to a white-collar city, with a profound impact on conceptions of race, gender, and work. At the same time, oilfield services companies promoted an ideal of U.S. global power with the white-collar expert at its center, a new imperial vision that sought to make U.S. capital safe in a postcolonial world while also offering a triumphalist explanation for the nation's transition from an industrial to a post-industrial economy. Tying together evidence from popular culture, print media, corporate annual reports, and the papers of labor unions and company managers, this talk examines how the oilfield services industry reshaped the space of Houston as well as labor politics in oilfields across the globe. 
Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Dean of the College; Historical Studies Program
Contact: Christian Crouch  845-758-6874  crouch@bard.edu