Events

Upcoming Events

  • Nov
    30
    Shinjuku, Tokyo 1968: Media Panics, Nonconformists, and the Play of Politics
    William Marotti, Associate Professor of History, UCLA
    Time: 6:30 pm
    Location: Olin, Room 102
    more >




Past Events

              

2015

Thursday, November 19, 2015

From Fellahin to Fatah: The Experience of Palestinian Political Prisoners

A talk by Rebecca Granato, Assistant Dean, Al-Quds Bard College for Arts and Sciences
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  12:30 pm
In the past several weeks, hundreds of Palestinians have been arrested or administratively detained by Israel. This technique of mass arrests is not new to Israel. Since the Occupation's inception in 1967, hundreds of thousands of Palestinians have cycled through the Israeli prison system, many of them more than once. This talk will trace the evolution of an organized prisoner movement in the 1970s and 1980s and will look at how different the situation is amongst prisoners today. Rebecca Granato, Bard class of 1999, is the Assistant Dean and a founding faculty member of Al-Quds Bard College for Arts and Sciences. She has since been a Palestinian American Research Center Fellow, faculty associate of the Bard Institute for Writing and Thinking, and PhD candidate of Middle Eastern History at the University of Waterloo.
Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement
Contact: Nora Palandjian  845-752-4794  npalandj@bard.edu
  Monday, November 16, 2015

Photographing Nigeria from North to South and Back Again

Glenna Gordon
Olin, Room 102  4:45 pm
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Art History Program; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Program
Contact: Drew thompson  845-758-4600  dthompso@bard.edu
Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Desert Borderland: Local Identity, Territoriality
and the Making of Modern Egypt and Libya

Matthew Ellis
Assistant Professor of History, Sarah Lawrence College

Olin, Room 204  5:00 pm
co-sponsored by
Historical Studies and Africana Studies
Sponsored by: Middle Eastern Studies Program
Contact: Omar Cheta  845-758-6265  ocheta@bard.edu
Monday, October 19, 2015

To celebrate the recent work by
Associate Professor Wendy Urban-Mead



The Gender of Piety: Family, Faith, and Colonial Rule in Matabeleland, Zimbabwe
Finberg House  6:30 pm
Light refreshments will be served
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; Bard Prison Initiative; Historical Studies Program; Master of Arts in Teaching Program
Contact: BardMAT  845-758-7145  mat@bard.edu
Tuesday, September 29, 2015

The Best of Corto Circuito: A Mini Festival of Short Films

Campus Center, Weis Cinema  5:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Corto Circuito was formed eleven years ago in to showcase short films made by filmmakers from Latin America, Spain and the United States in Spanish and Portuguese. Since then, it has grown exponentially, becoming a reference in the film festival scene of New York City and the country at large. Each year, their selections have included animated and fictional short films, as well as documentaries and experimental works, many of which were United States and New York premieres.The Best of Corto Circuito: A Mini Festival of Short Films will consist of a screening of selected short films from the festival, with an emphasis on human rights and immigration. To complement the film program of The Best of Corto Circuito, there will be a Q&A with a surprise filmmaker guest, and a panel discussion with Diana Vargas and Laura Turégano, Co-founders of Cortocircuito.

This event is a collaboration between Bard College and the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center at New York University. Organized by Prof. López-Gay, Spanish Studies. All films are in Spanish with English subtitles. Free and open to the public.
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; Center for Foreign Languages and Cultures; Center for Moving Image Arts; Division of Languages and Literature; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Program; LAIS Program; Spanish Studies
Contact: Patricia Lopez-Gay  845-758-6050  plopezga@bard.edu
Monday, September 28, 2015

The Architecture of Exile: Palestinian Refugee Camps as World Heritage Site

Olin, Room 102  6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Monday, September 28th, 2015 at 6pm in Olin Room 102In recent years, architectural conservation has become a field of knowledge and a practice able to reframe our understanding of aesthetics, cultural heritage, and history. For some, architectural conservation was understood mainly as a discipline that froze time, space, and culture, reducing buildings to lifeless objects for contemplation. Today, however, it has evolved into an operative field that includes thinking about material and immaterial cultures, the preservation of social and identity structures, and the negotiation of contested spaces where national identities are constructed and demolished.Architectural preservationists started to identify and protect structures built centuries ago. Later on, we discovered that modernism, which claimed to be ahistorical, needed to be preserved as part of an historical narration of the city. Now we are at a moment when rough industrial zones can be thought of as places of national heritage, and refugee camps become sites of heated discussions about what should and should not be remembered, or perhaps more importantly, what should and should not  be forgotten.

If we look at refugee camps through the lens of architectural preservation, how might our understanding of camps change?Refugee camps are considered temporary spaces to be quickly dismantled. But how are we to understand the Palestinian refugee camps that are now almost 70 years old? Can we consider them cultural sites to be preserved?For many, being asked to look at refugee camps from this perspective may be a disturbing proposition. But this is the reality that is in front of our eyes, and therefore one that we cannot negate. One of the urgent questions becomes: do Palestinian refugee camps have history? And how might this history be mobilized for the right of return, instead of being perceived as a threat? And at the same time how does the concept of architectural heritage change when applied to refugee camps?
For the workshop we would like to examine these questions and explore the political implications of challenging existing categories of nation, camp, and heritage. In collaboration with the Riwaq Center for Architectural Conservation and in the framework of the Riwaq Biennial, we have just started work on the documentation that will support the inscription of a group of buildings in refugee camps as World Heritage Sites under the protection of UNESCO.Sandi Hilal and Alessandro Petti are both architects and artists. Together they direct Campus in Camps, an experimental educational program based in Dheisheh refugee camp in Palestine. They are also co-founders, along with Eyal Weizman, of the Decolonizing Architecture Art Residency  in Bethlehem.
Sponsored by: Human Rights Project
Contact: Sarah Petty  401-418-3904  sp7920@bard.edu
Thursday, September 24, 2015

Italian Fascism's Empire Cinema

A lecture by Ruth Ben Ghiat
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Italian Fascism’s Empire Cinema (Indiana University Press, 2015) by Prof. Ruth Ben Ghiat (New York University) is the first in-depth study of the feature and documentary films made during Mussolini’s dictatorship about Italy’s African and Balkan occupations. The fruit of research in military and film archives, it focuses on the dramatic years between the invasion of Ethiopia (1935-1936) and the loss of the colonies (1941-43) during World War Two. Promoted and created at the highest levels of the regime, empire films were Italy’s entry into an international marketplace of colonial and exotic offerings, and engaged many of Italy’s emerging filmmaking talents (Roberto Rossellini) as well as its most experienced and cosmopolitan directors (Augusto Genina, Mario Camerini).  Shot partly or wholly in Libya, Somalia, and Ethiopia, these movies reinforced Fascist racial and labor policies: their sets were sites of violence and of interracial intimacies. Like the imperial histories they recount, they were largely forgotten for most of the postwar period.Ben Ghiat will present her recent study which restores these films to Italian and international film history, and offers a case study of the intertwining of war and cinema and of the unfolding of imperial policy in the context of dictatorship.Respondent: Joseph Luzzi
Moderated by Franco Baldasso

Sponsored by: Hannah Arendt Center; Historical Studies Program; Italian Studies Program
Contact: Franco Baldasso  845-758-7377  baldasso@bard.edu
Friday, September 18, 2015

Open Seminar: The Syrian Challenge and European Union

Olin, Room 202  1:30 pm – 3:00 pm
Join a conversation about the Syrian challenge and the European Union facilitated by Nesrin McMeekin and Greg Moynahan.

This event is sponsored by Bard Model United Nations and The Center for Civic Engagement.

Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement
Contact: Jonathan Becker  845-758-7094  becker@bard.edu
  Friday, May 8, 2015

Chinese Music – EastRiver Ensemble

Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Bard College's Traditional Chinese Instrument Collective in collaboration with the GCC invites the EastRiver Ensemble from the Mencius Society to perform a concert for the local community!

Come join us for an early evening of traditional Chinese music. There will be food and drink!

Sponsored by: Asian Studies Program
Contact: Obadiah Wright  408-806-1439  ow5646@bard.edu
Download: EastRiver Ensemble Ad.pdf
  Monday, May 4, 2015

Rendering Responsibility:
State Imaginaries and the Movements against the Vietnam and Iraq Wars

Emily Brissette, PhD
SUNY Oneonta

RKC 102B   1:30 pm
The movement against the Vietnam War began modestly, but grew in both size and intensity as the years and the war dragged on. The movement against the Iraq War, in contrast, came together quickly and massively in the space of months and then largely receded from public view. Although the presence (and then absence) of the draft is often invoked as an explanation for the different trajectories of these movements, military recruitment practices are not the most important thing to have changed since the Vietnam era. Drawing on original archival work, this talk will trace how basic understandings of the nature of the state and citizenship (what I call “state imaginaries”) have also changed, and argue that this had profound consequences for antiwar activism in each moment by shaping how and where activists located responsibility for war.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Sociology Program
Contact: Yuval Elmelech  845-758-7547  elmelech@bard.edu
Monday, April 27, 2015

Leprosy, Sex, and Sensibility in the 18th century French Antilles

Kristen Block
Associate Professor of History, University of Tennessee

Olin, Room 201  5:30 pm
In the early decades of the eighteenth century, a supposed outbreak of leprosy in Guadeloupe spurred a flurry of activity and many pages of manuscript reports.  Leprosy itself had become a very rare condition in 18th century Europe, and so medical professionals resident in Guadeloupe and Martinique debated the patterns of its transmission (cohabitation, heredity, wet-nursing, or even prolonged contact through daily interaction [conversation]), its cure, and even its very definition. But all were certain that the disease had spread from Africa via the Atlantic slave trade, which led to fears of its communicability across racial lines.  Colonists’ libertine attitude towards interracial social and sexual contact were already seen as leading to dangerous contagions (like syphilis, which was seen by many to be more prevalent in Africa, where yaws, another leprosy-like disease, was endemic).  This paper discusses how the uncertainty surrounding this disease, as well as the fact that leprosy caused so little pain, brought up fears of the “sensibility” involved in the colonial project.  

Kristen Block is a scholar of the early modern Atlantic world whose first book, Ordinary Lives in the Early Caribbean (Georgia 2012), examines the entangled histories of Spain and England in the Caribbean during the long seventeenth century as both colonial powers searched for profit and attempted to assert their own version of religious dominance.  Her second book project is exploring how Caribbean residents defined disease, contagion, and how conflict and hybridity affected their attempts at healing. 

Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program
Contact: Christian Crouch  845-758-6874  crouch@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 21, 2015

2015 Eugene Meyer Lecture: Professor Mark Lytle, Lyford Paterson Edwards and Helen Gray Edwards Professor of Historical Studies

Nixon and Kissinger: Transatlantic Relations, the Nixon Doctrine, and Detente
Preston  5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Eminent historian Professor Mark Lytle, who retires from Bard at the end of the 2014/15 academic year after forty years of distinguished service, delivers the 2015 Eugene Meyer Annual Lecture. He will speak on President Nixon, Henry Kissinger and their influence on America in the world.
Professor Lytle is the author of The Gentle Subversive: Rachel Carson, Silent Spring and the Rise of the Environmental Movement (2007); America's Uncivil Wars: The Sixties Era from Elvis to the Fall of Richard Nixon (2006); After the Fact: The Art of Historical Detection (6th ed., 2009); Experience History: Interpreting America’s Past (9th ed., 2013); United States: A Narrative History (3rd ed., 2014); The Origins of the Iranian-American Alliance, 1940-1953 (1987). 
Eugene Meyer (1875-1959), for whom the annual lecture and the Eugene Meyer Chair are named, was the owner and publisher of the Washington Post, chairman of the Federal Reserve, and first president of the World Bank. Previous Eugene Meyer speakers include Sir David Cannadine, Andrew Roberts, Fintan O'Toole and Colm Tóibín. The Eugene Meyer Chair was endowed at Bard in 2010. 
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program
Contact: Richard Aldous--Eugene Meyer Professor  845-758-7398  raldous@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Nature Reserves, Territory, and the Question of Palestinian

Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Bard College’s Human Rights Project, Middle Eastern Studies , EUS, History Departments Present:Omar Tesdell: Nature Reserves, Territory, and the Question of Palestinian CultivationTUESDAY, 14 April, 5-7pm. Olin 304.Beginning mid-nineteenth century, first French and Ottoman officials, and later British officials set aside significant tracts of land for environmental conservation in the Arab world. The convention was continued under subsequent Jordanian administration of the West Bank. In fact, nature areas remain one of the largest classifications of land in the Palestinian West Bank today, covering more than 30 official reserves, or about 5 percent of the land area. This little-known legacy reveals the enduring and contested status of protected conservation areas in Historic Palestine. Recent scholarship on the topic has elucidated the establishment of forest and nature reserves in Palestine and connections with other British colonial sites. However, little is known about the relationship between conservation programs and affected Palestinians. This paper explores the contested status of protected areas through the articulation of official conservation programs and Palestinian cultivation practice in the West Bank.Overview of Omar Tesdell’s Work and Achievements: Annoucing the fourth recipient of the Ibrahim Abu Lughod Award in Palestine Studies, Omar Imseeh TesdellThe Center for Palestine Studies at Columbia University is pleased to announce the fourth recipient of the Ibrahim Abu Lughod Award in Palestine Studies, Omar Imseeh Tesdell . The award recognizes and seeks to foster innovative and ground-breaking scholarship on issues related to Palestine and Palestinians.Omar Imseeh Tesdell is Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at Birzeit University. He will spend Spring 2015 at Columbia working on a book project based on his dissertation, Shadow Spaces: Territory, Sovereignty, and the Question of Palestinian Cultivation . A spatial history of Palestinian environmental and agricultural practice, the book explores the relationship between the work of cultivation and claims to land. Cultivation in the conventional sense is understood to be an abstract concept that allows institutions like the state to deploy technologies of control, whether through law, coercion, or agricultural development. Yet generally overlooked is an understanding of cultivation as the longstanding concrete practice of farmers to uphold collective claims to land. In contrast to a self-evident concept of cultivation, the practice of cultivation thus emerges as a flashpoint to consider the question of territory and sovereignty. As such, the book offers a spatial history of cultivation in Palestine and develops a theoretical understanding of it as constituted by both colonialism and oppositional political community arrayed around it.Two works emerging from his research are forthcoming in edited volumes, one entitled “Land and the Question of Palestinian Cultivation” in New Directions in Palestinian Studies , and another entitled “On Naming and Being” in Being Palestinian: Personal Reflections on Palestinian Identity in the Diaspora from Edinburgh University Press. Tesdell completed his Ph.D. in the Department of Geography at the University of Minnesota in 2013. His research has been supported by the Arab Council for Social Sciences (ACSS), Social Science Research Council (SSRC), an NEH-funded grant from the Palestinian American Research Center (PARC), and the University of Minnesota.This award has been made possible by the generosity of Abdel Mohsin Al-Qattan, through the A.M. Qattan Foundation, in honor of his friend, the Palestinian scholar and intellectual, Ibrahim Abu-Lughod (1929-2001). Their close friendship began in the aftermath of the Nakbah of 1948 and evolved into a shared commitment to justice for Palestinians to be realized in part through support for excellence in higher education and scholarship.Omar Tesdell, assistant professor in the Department of Geography at Birzeit University and Ibrahim Abu-Lughod Post-doctoral Fellow at Columbia University’s Center for Palestine Studies.
Sponsored by: Environmental and Urban Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Program; Human Rights Project; Middle Eastern Studies Program
Contact: Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins  845-758-7201  sstamato@bard.edu
  Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Omar Tesdell: Nature Reserves, Territory, and the Question of Palestinian Cultivation

Olin 304  5:00 pm
Beginning mid-nineteenth century, first French and Ottoman officials, and later British officials set aside significant tracts of land for environmental conservation in the Arab world. The convention was continued under subsequent Jordanian administration of the West Bank. In fact, nature areas remain one of the largest classifications of land in the Palestinian West Bank today, covering more than 30 official reserves, or about 5 percent of the land area. This little-known legacy reveals the enduring and contested status of protected conservation areas in Historic Palestine. Recent scholarship on the topic has elucidated the establishment of forest and nature reserves in Palestine and connections with other British colonial sites. However, little is known about the relationship between conservation programs and affected Palestinians. This paper explores the contested status of protected areas through the articulation of official conservation programs and Palestinian cultivation practice in the West Bank.
Sponsored by: Environmental and Urban Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Project; Middle Eastern Studies Program
Contact: Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins  845-758-7201  sstamato@bard.edu
  Thursday, April 2, 2015

Israeli Apartheid and the Divestment Movement

Campus Center, Weis Cinema  6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Hazem Jamjoum, PhD candidate at NYU, will be speaking about apartheid as a legal category and how it applies to the Israeli occupation of Palestine. He will eleborate on the international divestment movement and why it is important to support.
Contact: Connor Gadek  602-750-0029  cg6773@bard.edu
Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Coups, Cadavers, and Catastrophes: The Persian Gulf in the New Year

Preston  5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
The Persian Gulf region is never quiet, and the start of 2015 has been no exception: the death of the Saudi King; the collapse of the Yemeni government; the continued expansion of ISIS; and the new necessity of collaborating and negotiating with Iran, all foreshadow a year of major change, turmoil, and power shifts.

Join James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and Humanities Walter Russell Mead, Bard Globalization and International Affairs Program (BGIA) Director Jonathan Cristol, and Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern & Historical Studies Omar Cheta for a discussion of the current/latest instability in the Persian Gulf and its impact on both American grand strategy and specific policy decisions in the region.

Sponsored by: Bard Globalization & International Affairs Program; Center for Civic Engagement; Historical Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Political Studies Program
Contact: Jessica Scott  jescott@bard.edu
Thursday, February 26, 2015

McKay After Morocco: Lost & Found in the Archives

Jean-Christophe Cloutier
RKC 101A  4:45 pm
This talk will address the discovery of Jamaican writer Claude McKay’s last novel, Amiable with Big Teeth, and show how its subsequent authentication—via extensive archival research—enabled the historical reconstruction necessary to properly contextualize and appreciate anew the final phases of McKay’s incredible intellectual and literary journey.

Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Literature Program
Contact: Tabetha Ewing  845-758-7548  ewing@bard.edu
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Mother Tongues and Other Tongues: Jews, Zionism, and the Politics of Language in Interwar Palestine

Liora Halperin
Assistant Professor of History & Jewish Studies
University of Colorado–Boulder

Olin, Room 204  6:00 pm
Liora Halperin is an Assistant Professor of History and Jewish Studies at the University of Colorado--Boulder. Her research focuses on Jewish cultural history, Jewish-Arab relations in Ottoman and Mandate Palestine, language ideology and policy, and the politics surrounding nation formation in Palestine in the years leading up to the creation of the State of Israel in 1948. Her first book, Babel in Zion: Jews, Nationalism and Language Diversity in Palestine, 1920-1948 was published last November by Yale University Press. 
Sponsored by: Division of Languages and Literature; Historical Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Translation Initiative
Contact: Omar Cheta  845-758-6822 x6265  ocheta@bard.edu