Events

Upcoming Events

  • Feb
    01
    Maré de Dentro: Life in Rio de Janeiro’s Favelas
    A Photo and Film Exhibit
    Location: Campus Center, Gallery
    more >

  • Mar
    04
    Technics of Space: Caricature and Empire on Hogan’s Alley
    Joshua Kopin '12
    PhD Candidate, The University of Texas at Austin

    Time: 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
    Location: Olin, Room 102
    more >

  • Mar
    12
    Deweyan and Confucian Ethics: A Challenge to the Ideology of Individualism
    Roger Ames
    The University of Hawaii

    Time: 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
    Location: TBD
    more >

  • May
    03
    The Treaty of Versailles at 100. The Consequences of the Peace.
    Time: 9:00 am – 6:00 pm
    Location: Levy Economics Institute
    more >




Past Events

                  

2019

  Friday, May 3, 2019 – Saturday, May 4, 2019

The Treaty of Versailles at 100. The Consequences of the Peace.

Levy Economics Institute  9:00 am – 6:00 pm
A conference to mark the centenary of the Versailles Conference and Treaty, which ended the First World War.  
Contact: Sean McMeekin  845-758-6822 x7448  smcmeeki@bard.edu
  Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Deweyan and Confucian Ethics: A Challenge to the Ideology of Individualism

Roger Ames
The University of Hawaii

TBD  4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
John Dewey, in his resistance to foundational individualism, declares that individual autonomy so conceived is a fiction; for Dewey, it is association that is a fact. In his own language: “There is no sense in asking how individuals come to be associated. They exist and operate in association.” In a way that resonates with Confucian role ethics, the revolutionary Dewey particularizes the fact of associated living and valorizes it by developing a vision of the habitude of unique, defused, relationally-constituted human beings. That is, he develops a distinctive, if not idiosyncratic language of habits and “individuality” to describe the various modalities of association that enable human beings to add value to their activities and to transform mere relations into a communicating community.

In Confucian role ethics, Dewey’s contention that association is a fact is restated in a different vocabulary by appealing to specific roles rather than unique habitudes for stipulating the specific forms that association takes within lives lived in family and community—that is, the various roles we live as sons and teachers, grandmothers and neighbors. For Confucianism, not only are these roles descriptive of our associations, they are also prescriptive in the sense that roles in family and community are themselves normative, guiding us in the direction of appropriate conduct. Whereas for both Confucianism and Dewey, mere association is a given, flourishing families and communities are what we are able to make of our facticity as the highest human achievement.

Roger T. Ames is Humanities Chair Professor at Peking University, Co-Chair of the Academic Advisory Committee of the Peking University Berggruen Research Center, and Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the University of Hawai’i. He is former editor of Philosophy East & West and founding editor of China Review International. Ames has authored several interpretative studies of Chinese philosophy and culture: Thinking Through Confucius (1987), Anticipating China (1995), Thinking from the Han (1998), and Democracy of the Dead (1999) (all with D.L. Hall), Confucian Role Ethics: A Vocabulary (2011), and most recently “Human Becomings: Theorizing ‘Persons’ for Confucian Role Ethics” (forthcoming). His publications also include translations of Chinese classics: Sun-tzu: The Art of Warfare (1993); Sun Pin: The Art of Warfare (1996) (with D.C. Lau); the Confucian Analects (1998) and the Classic of Family Reverence: The Xiaojing (2009) (both with H. Rosemont), Focusing the Familiar: The Zhongyong (2001), and The Daodejing (with D.L. Hall) (2003). Almost all of his publications are now available in Chinese translation, including his philosophical translations of Chinese canonical texts. He has most recently been engaged in compiling the new Sourcebook of Classical Confucian Philosophy, and in writing articles promoting a conversation between American pragmatism and Confucianism.
Sponsored by: Asian Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Philosophy Program; Religion Program
Contact: Robert Culp  845-758-7395  culp@bard.edu
Monday, March 4, 2019

Technics of Space: Caricature and Empire on Hogan’s Alley

Joshua Kopin '12
PhD Candidate, The University of Texas at Austin

Olin, Room 102  5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Part of a larger dissertation project, this talk makes a connection between the subjects of early comics, which often included immigrants and their children, like the Irish-American Yellow Kid; and political cartoons about immigration and American imperialism from the periods of the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Spanish-American War. Drawing on his long-established connection to yellow journalism and noting that, while explicitly Irish, the Yellow Kid is drawn in the visual idiom of anti-Chinese caricature, this talk posits that caricature is a technology of empire and inclusion that, through ideas about immigrants and expansionism that were often clothed in metaphors of childhood, served to differentiate acceptable, if unruly, white citizen subjects from imperial others. 
Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Asian Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Program; Irish and Celtic Studies (ICS) Program; Literature Program; the Social Studies Division
Contact: Tabetha Ewing  845-758-7548  ewing@bard.edu
  Monday, February 11, 2019

Policing the Greatest Generation: Carceral Controversies and Service-Member Activism, from World War to Cold War

Tejasvi Nagaraja
Postdoctoral Fellow in Global American Studies
Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University

Olin, Room 102  5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
In examining the intersecting ties across foreign and domestic realms, scholars have considered how warfare infrastructures interact with social diversities, opportunities, and inequalities in each country. Americanist scholarship has evaluated the complex relationship between the “hard” power of national security, with “soft” realms such as the welfare state and civil rights. Yet historians have yet to adequately interpret the ties across the two spheres of “hard” power, foreign policy and criminal justice. How does our story of U.S. global power and security statecraft change when we attend to contestations over policing and incarceration, particularly as they affected service members?

From the Second World War into the early Cold War—the signal era of mass citizen-soldiering—diverse GIs and their loved ones grappled with experiences of military policing, courts-martial, incarceration, and execution as well as the civilian justice system’s treatment of service members. This talk considers popular concerns about crime and punishment, as they made a fundamental mark on American experiences of military service and foreign policy. These cases and causes took place across the U.S. South, U.S. North, and overseas, affected individuals from all three spheres, and inspired popular advocacy across all three too. This talk situates this carceral through line in the context of a larger book project—about labor, race, and international relations within the process of midcentury U.S. global militarization. This book presents U.S. service members and their loved ones as protagonists within American and transnational debates about economic, criminal justice, and geopolitical affairs. It argues that U.S. foreign policy’s statecraft was deeply entangled and embattled in relation to intersecting “domestic” social movements.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Historical Studies Program
Contact: Robert Culp  845-758-7395  culp@bard.edu
  Friday, February 8, 2019

“Think Different”: The Silicon Valley and the Grassroots Transformation of Work and Democracy in the 20th Century

Jeannette Alden Estruth
Postdoctoral Visiting Scholar
The American Academy of Arts and Sciences
The Harvard University Berkman-Klein Center for Internet and Society

Olin, Room 102  2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
The late 20th century saw the meteoric rise of the high-technology industry in the United States. Synonymous with this growth was the region that came to be known as California’s Silicon Valley. The Silicon Valley, however, did not just represent a place or an industry. It also encompassed a new set of ideas about American prosperity and the country’s future. Jeannette Estruth’s research traces the genesis of these ideas, and finds them in the early community movements that fought the material challenges presented by the technology industry’s rapid economic expansion. She shows that the industry’s encounters with dissenting voices produced new visions about what work meant, how economies functioned, and what democracy should look like. In doing so, Estruth argues that the local technology sector revolutionized American political thought in the late 20th century, creating a new economic era by the turn of the 21st.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Historical Studies Program
Contact: Robert Culp  845-758-7395  culp@bard.edu
  Friday, February 1, 2019

Beyond the “White Man’s Burden” and the “Yellow Peril”: Rethinking U.S.–Pacific Relations in the Progressive Era

Chris Suh
PhD Candidate, Department of History, Stanford University

Olin, Room 102  1:30 pm – 3:00 pm
This talk will examine the history of race, empire, and inequality during the Progressive Era in the transpacific context by focusing on the life of an American-educated Korean reformer named Yun Ch’i-ho (1865–1945), best known today as a “collaborator” during Korea’s colonial period under Japan. Drawing on archival sources from South Korea and the United States, this talk will explain the process through which the United States came to include Japan in the “family of civilized nations,” and the ways in which American ideas about racial “progress”—often articulated with reference to African Americans in the South—both contributed to and challenged the imperial order in the Pacific, precisely at the moment when the United States began to emerge as a Pacific power.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Historical Studies Program
Contact: Robert Culp  845-758-7395  culp@bard.edu
Friday, February 1, 2019 – Friday, March 1, 2019

Maré de Dentro: Life in Rio de Janeiro’s Favelas

A Photo and Film Exhibit
Campus Center, Gallery 
A panel discussion, followed by a reception, will take place in Weis Cinema on Thursday, February 28, 5:00–6:30 p.m.
Sponsored by: Anthropology Program; Art History Program; Bard Center for the Study of Hate; Center for Civic Engagement; Environmental and Urban Studies Program; Global and International Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Program; LAIS Program; Office of Inclusive Excellence; Photography Program; Political Studies Program; Sociology Program
Contact: Peter Klein  845-758-7218  pklein@bard.edu
  Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Settler Militarism: World War II in Hawai‘i and the Making of U.S. Empire

Juliet Nebolon
Postdoctoral Fellow in Global American Studies
The Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History
Harvard University

Olin, Room 205  5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Juliet Nebolon’s talk will focus on her book manuscript, “Settler Militarism: World War II in Hawai‘i and the Making of U.S. Empire,” which is a history of the World War II period of martial law in Hawai‘i (1941–44). The project analyzes the overlapping regimes of  settler colonialism and militarization during this period, as well as the logics of race, indigeneity, and gender that intersected within these regimes. Her talk will explore these dynamics at work in the domains of public health and blood donation, domesticity and home economics campaigns, and internment across Hawai‘i and the Pacific Islands.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Historical Studies Program
Contact: Robert Culp  845-758-7395  culp@bard.edu